What has Bruce been up to during lockdown?

It appears I’ve been relatively quiet during the past 5 months, at least on this blog. There have been personal reasons for this, as covered in my personal blog. The relevant rants are:

Since I got back to Napier in early May, I’ve been working with Dr Gemma Webster on our project ‘Information avoidance and diabetes’. There aren’t many posts on that blog yet, but here is Professor Hazel Hall’s writing on the poster I presented on Monday (8 June) at at an e-conference. You can find tweets about it at #AECIST20. And look out for a blog post in the next week or so.

poster on 'information avoidance and diabetes' project

Click the image to see the full-size poster in a new window or tab.

Outside of Napier, I’ve also been doing some work with the Scottish Tech Army, mostly proofreading and editing internal documents. I’ve continued working with £eithChooses and ‘my’ Edinburgh community councils.

Today, during this week’s ‘non-work day’ I’ve been updating my online CV and publication-list. The latest two additions are two papers that have very recently been accepted for publication. The first is on the RIVAL project, led by Professor Hazel Hall. This paper covers the project’s contributions so far to practitioner-researcher engagement, and looks ahead to further anticipated contributions from more networking events. Hazel’s post looks forward to presenting that paper the (virtual) 83rd Annual Meeting of the Association for Information Science and Technology (ASIST2020).

The second covers how Scottish community councillors tend to develop and us information literacy (IL). This paper is an output from the LIL-DEM project, led by Peter Cruickshank. The key messages are that (1) community councillors report that their information-handing skills are not derived from their formal education (the focus of so much IL research) but from work and everyday life; (2) that these are practiced by joint working. This, I hope, is a small but valuable addition to investigations into workplace IL, as for example examined in Information at Work: information management in the workplace, edited by Katriina Byström, Jannica Heinström and Ian Ruthven.

And so my final self-trumpet toot tonight is that my review of that amazing book should soon appear in the Journal of Librarianship and Information Science.

Meet the RIVAL network: members, skills, and locations all mapped

(shamelessly copied from Hazel Hall’s blog-post)


Professor Hazel Hall and I have recently added new content about network members to the Research Impact Value and LIS (RIVAL) project web site. This includes:

This adds to existing content on RIVAL people:

If you are looking for library and information science professionals in Scotland interested in research impact and value, this is the place to start.

Published – almost!

It’s very pleasing to say that the latest paper by Hazel Hall, Peter Cruickshank and me has been accepted for publication. A PDF of Closing the researcher-practitioner gap: an exploration of the impact of an AHRC networking grant will become available on the university repository page in the not-too-distant future. (I think it’s embargoed until the relevant issue of Journal of Documentation is published.)

This paper complements our earlier paper researching the network of Library and Information Science researchers and practitioners sparked by the AHRC-funded Designing Research Excellence and Methods (DREaM) project.

The networking effects we found are part of the inspiration for our current RIVAL project.

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